Black and white.

Life is not black and white, but rather a series of greys that fade and deepen at different times. Sometimes the light shines out from the clouds and other times lies hidden, just a silver outline hinting that, if you could just sit still long enough, there will be a brighter dawn or a shining dusk that lights the sky.


I'm  a great fan of monochrome photos. It's quite possible to get a really good effect even on a dark or bright day. Yesterday (as a soul-clearing, cobweb blowing experience) I went for a walk. I wanted to feel the breeze against my face and to keep having to pull my hair back, to watch the skudding clouds and to breathe.

I went to our local church. It's about 500 years old, a real symbol of eternity there, then. Still a vibrant Christian community; we go about once a month to this church for parade services because our regular church don't do uniformed parades and this is the church that is linked to the primary school the children attended so this is the church where they joined the groups. Is that complicated enough? In other words, we are members of another congregation but this is a regular visiting place.


The church yard is quite large and slopes, so one gets a real feeling of perspective looking over it. Graves stretch down the hill and rather cling to the slopes. The oldest date from the 1700s but newer graves are freshly dug for the most recently departed. And the grave stones are worn in places, fresh black marble in others. I would have the worn red sandstone (our local stone) as against the impressively shiny black, but I rather prefer the idea of being buried in the forest with a tree as my headstone.


Some of the graves are marked, flowers or small signs that somebody has been to see them. Others slope precariously, leaning towards the neighbours as if the two are discussing the latest gossip or swapping notes on how often they have been looked at.


Fashions change in graves as well as clothes. Where simple headstones changed to block graves, and crosses are grouped together in one area; who started the cross fashion? Who copied whom? And is imitation in death still a form of flattery?


Two obelisks; not what I expected in a suburban graveyard. The Fowler family obviously had a 'thing' for Egypt... or were they masons? As in the Grand Lodge of Masons?

There were Angels, of course, not Weeping Angels, but just the two; one stood, still and tranquil, holding some flowers that, unlike the quiet sleepers beneath, will never decay and lose their shape:


the other knelt, hands clasped in prayer. I couldn't read the names beneath; was it a wife or a child whose passing had made the anguish visible in stone?

Reading the inscriptions in stone can lead to some sudden catches in breath;


 John Watson?

Not The John Watson, but good enough to make us pause, to read the stone and to giggle at the name beneath. Job description? Poet. There is a Sir William Watson (poet) on Wikipedia; can this be him? I've studied English to degree level and never met his name.....


And some stand out for sheer audacity; the most incongruous grave is so Italian, so Catholic with the mosaic and angels singing down that I had to swap back to colour. Whoever Eliza and Sir Andrew Barclay were, I'm prepared to believe that they went on the Grand Tour of Europe. Where else would one get the idea of a grotto?



Comments

  1. Fascinating. I am not a fan of the black polished look either, I think that a nice sandstone that will gradually disappear would be my choice. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Comment catch up; I know I'm back in October here! Thanks for stopping by. The red is such a lovely colour as well.

      Delete
  2. Hi, thanks for visiting my blog :) I have just read through a few of your posts... I like the monochrome pictures gives a grave yard a slightly eerie look, not sure if I would want to be the house over looking it though. Liking the Game of Thrones!! I started listening on audio book but didn't get too far, my husband and older boy have read them, big books! Maybe I will try again. Also we, many years ago, went to that same farm! We had a half term break in Wales and stayed in little house next to the Feather inn, very small pub, and I am not going to attempt to spell the place two LL's right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Two Lls. I'm just now catching up on thank you comments. Damnation. One day I'll be ahead of the game. Thanks for calling by.

      Delete
  3. I love looking around churchyards, the headstones are fascinating. I can't say I like the crosses, obelisks or angels, just a simple headstone would be my preference.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suppose asking to be like Highlander and live forever is impossible, so a simple headstone will suffice.

      Delete
  4. I really like the way the church and its surroundings looks in black and white. Moodier and maybe a little spooky but it also captures the incredible age of the place. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for commenting. I really should use monochrome in photos more. When I get artistic my choice is often black and white pencil, it's strange that photographically I use bright colour most!

      Delete
  5. Very atmospheric seeing it all in black and white.
    hope the windy walk and fresh air had the desired effect.
    Lisa x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed. Cleared a few good cobwebs, gave me a breather and set me off on a good path at school.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for stopping by! I love reading your comments.

Popular posts from this blog

Do you cycle? You need to read this article

Small Claims proposal needs some small actions off you!!!

Blogger, why are you messing with my head?